On working days, he helps customers protect their business and employees, in his spare time he saves lives in the archipelago

Thomas Runholm of Nexus is the coworker who is constantly busy. On weekdays, he helps our customers and partners to achieve an optimal solution to protect organizations and society with trusted identities for employees and IoT devices. Thomas and Nexus often work proactively with secure digitalization to avoid emergency situations.

On weekends and vacations, Thomas is a volunteer in the Swedish Sea Rescue Society and helps people in emergencies in the archipelago. That work also involves giving concrete advice and help, but that’s where the similarities end. As a station manager on the island of Möja, a day (and night) can consist of towing boats in distress, helping people that are ill or hurt far out at sea and who cannot get home. It’s often about acting when the weather has changed and people who are not so used to the sea end up in a situation which they cannot handle.

"No two days are alike, you never know how long the work shift will be or what people you will meet", says Thomas who has volunteered in the Swedish Sea Rescue Society for eight years.

Considering it is volunteer work, sea rescuers do not get paid, but despite that, there are 2,300 sea rescuers in Sweden who spend a lot of their spare time helping people and saving lives at sea every year.

"It is very important and meaningful work and we at Nexus are happy and proud of Thomas’ commitment and drive in this important work. Therefore we would like to give a donation to the Swedish Sea Rescue Society, who depend on voluntary donations to continue with their mission to save lives at sea", says Magnus Malmström, CEO of Nexus.

About the Swedish Sea Rescue Society

The Swedish Sea Rescue Society is a non-governmental organization with 72 rescue stations along the coast of Sweden and the lakes of Vänern, Vättern, Mälaren, Hjälmaren, Storsjön and some lakes in the regions of Dalarna and Kronoberg.

  • 2,300 volunteering and non-paid sea rescuers take a turn to staff these stations around the clock, all year round.
  • The organization live off membership fees, gifts and donations. In 2019, they got a little less than 200 million SEK. Of those, 81 million came from membership fees, 49 million from gifts, 41 million from people’s wills, 14 million from the Swedish Postcode Lottery, and the rest from collaborations with organizations and foundation donations.
  • The Swedish Sea Rescue Society is involved in 80 percent of all sea rescues in Sweden. Their primary mission is to save lives at sea.

Source: The Swedish Sea Rescue Society yearbook 2020

Published

About the Swedish Sea Rescue Society

The Swedish Sea Rescue Society is a non-governmental organization with 72 rescue stations along the coast of Sweden and the lakes of Vänern, Vättern, Mälaren, Hjälmaren, Storsjön and some lakes in the regions of Dalarna and Kronoberg. To learn more about the Swedish Sea Rescue Society, click here.

 

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